A glimpse into the studio

Flare and the (lens)Hood

For this shot I was able to go back and re-use the set up that didn’t work for my Pork Tenderloin shot (see the post below), but this time it succeeds!  I really love the white-on-white look for this shot, with the blown out background.  However, this raises a critical issue about flare!

Rant Alert!

OK. I’ll say this right up front… I’ve developed a pet peeve.  Through my teaching and workshops I’ve noticed that photographers have forgotten (or never knew) how to use lens hoods.  I constantly see photographers shooting, both in the studio and outside, with their lens hood securely mounted backwards on their lens.  I notice that Scott Kelby has observed the same thing as well (see his article here).  That lens hood is critical in preventing image destroying flare (stray light that bounces around in your lens and lowers contrast and sharpness).

In the studio, this is particularly critical, as we often position our lights so they are shining towards the lens, thus guaranteed to produce flare.  One simple test:  with your camera mounted in shooting position, put your head near your subject and look at your lens.  If you see your lights reflected in the lens, you have flare!  You must use something (a lens shade or a gobo) to block the light from the lens.

In this shoot, I have a huge soft box pointed directly at the lens…. here’s my set-up:

Note the camera on left is pointed directly at the big softbox behind the subject.  Therefore, it’s critical that I block off all light outside of the actual frame of the shot.  The best tool for doing this is a bellows style lens hood:

These adjustable lens hoods adapt to a wide range of lenses and focal lengths.  Note that I’ve actually put a custom made mask in the front slot that exactly masks off the frame of my 90mm lens.  Although these very handy tools are not as common as they once were, Lee Filters makes a very nice version.  Here are examples of the exact same shot, same exposure, both with and without the lens hood:

 

Without Lens Shade

With Lens Shade

 

Note the reduced contrast and saturation when the lens shade is not attached.  That’s the effect of flare!

Now you know…. Rant over!

Here’s Linsey with her oh-s0-tasty homemade marshmallows:

Here I demonstrate the back-of-the-spoon method of pouring the hot chocolate without disturbing the liqueur, and Linsey applies a touch of the torch:

Add a few marshmallows as props, and here’s the final shot:

Photography:  Rob Davidson
Food Styling:  Linsey Bell
Assistant & BTS shots: Nadia Cheema

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3 responses

  1. Margaret

    I can’t remember how I came across your site (must have been through blogs after blogs)but I can honestly say that yours is one of the most interesting and informative for the advance food photographer. Most blogs I read uses relies on natural ambient light and vellum as equipment but your equipment is super legit! I enjoyed reading all your entries and look forward to seeing more posts. Thank you!

    March 21, 2011 at 9:11 pm

    • So glad you enjoy the blog!
      New posts coming soon!
      Thanks,
      Rob

      March 21, 2011 at 9:20 pm

  2. Pingback: Miso Soup… it’s all in the details « Epicure in Light: Behind the Scenes

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